Republican Riber Basin Water and Drought PortalK

K-12 and Above

Drought

The "Drought for Kids" section from the National Drought Mitigation Center website gives an overview of drought, its impacts and what people can do to prepare for drought. There is also a collection of links to resources for teachers. Much of the material can be used as an introduction for high school students and adults.

The Delaware River Basin Commission offers "Drought for Kids," including sections that describe drought, give conservation tips, and note effects on plants and wildlife. There are also games and links to more good resources.

EduScapes has created a collection of links on drought and drought education.

Water

Project WET USA is a non-profit organization that publishes and distributes curricula on water education that is extremely effective in the classroom.  The activities and topics discuss water use, conservation, management, and water policy and can be utilized by students, educators, and communities.  There is a main United States site and a Nebraska site that you can visit for more information.

"Understanding Water Budgets and Balances," by the Boulder Area Sustainability Information Network, helps high school students and adults understand how much water is available in a given time and place.

The California Urban Water Conservation Council created a site called H2O House. This site discusses water saving techniques and gives children the opportunity to take a virtual tour of a house. During the virtual tour they discover areas of the home where water conservation practices can take place.

USGS provides information on the water cycle, history of water on the earth, and other basic water related information. They also break the site into sections that discuss groundwater, seawater, and floods.

"EEK!" (Environmental Education for Kids) is an electronic magazine for kids in grades 4 through 8. It was developed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Sections on the site range from water games to endangered species information.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection offers a site that gives children a chance to learn about water conservation and makes them part of the Clean Water Raingers. They get a certificate stating that they are a Water Conservation Crusader at the end of the program.

USGS has a Water Resources Page for Students and Teachers available on their website. Some of the categories found on the site include Groundwater Basics, Water Education Posters, USGS Education Resources, and Water Science for Schools.

The basic physical and chemical properties of water are discussed and illustrated in terms appropriate for middle and high school students on this website Water: An Important Natural Resource Used Every Day. In addition, this site leads to many other useful websites that further discuss each subtopic including water pollution, water conservation and the hydrologic cycle.

Weather and Climate Change

NOAA has specific activities related to weather and climate change for children in grades K-5 and 6-12. The activities range from printable coloring books to weather puzzles.

The National Weather Service site has a variety of information and activities on topics like thunderstorms, hurricanes, and safety tips.

Other Resources

The Digital Library of Earth Science Education maintains several collections, including the Digital Water Education Library, which can be searched by terms such as "drought," "climate," or "seasonal." Searches can be refined by grade level and other criteria. Step-by-step: Go to dlese.org. Click on "collections" (the third blue bar down) and select DWEL when the box of choices opens up. Then click the blue oval search button to the left. Enter a search term such as "drought" and refine the search by other criteria as needed.

The Environmental Protection Agency website has a Kid's Club section that discusses a variety of environmental topics. Topics included are water, conservation, recycling, human health, and more. Topics are broken down into sections for Kids, High School Students, and Teachers.